Bengal Cat

Bengal Cat

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Bengal Cat

 


Bengal Cats

Author: Dan Rice;

Bengal Cat

Author: Dennis Kelsey-Wood;

Bengal Cats

Author: Dan Rice;

Guide to Owning a Bengal Cat

Author: Jean S. Mill;

Jamil’s Clever Cat

Author: Fiona French;

Guide to Owning a Bengal Cat

Author: Jean S. Mill;

Bengal Cats

Author: Lynn M. Stone;

ST.FRANCIS HOSPICE FOR CATS
Registered Charity No 1062053
St. Francis Hospice for Cats is not a re-homing centre but a registered hospice for chronically sick and elderly cats. The Hospice look after around 80 cats whilst also caring for a feral colony in the Derby area. They are included here as they are desperately in need of donations and sponsors to enable them carry on with their invaluable work. You could make a real difference by sending a donation however small. If you are in the Derby area perhaps you could lend a hand with a fund-raising event? You can contact the hospice as above or visit their web site for more details of their work.
Indoor Homes Needed: St. Francis Hospice is looking for loving homes for cats in their care who are carrying FIV but who are otherwise healthy. The Hospice is happy to pick up any future vet bills. Please Note: These cats will need to be ‘indoor’ cats only.
3 Sapperton Close Littleover Derby Derbyshire DE23 7NX
Tel: 01332 272139
Email: stfrancis@derbycounty.co.uk
Website: www.paws.eu.com

Bengal Cat

Litter Trays

Cats are the most fastidious of animals and are easily housetrained to use a litter tray. There are many different styles of boxes and types of litter. Litter choices include dry earth recycled paper sand clumping clay and natural litter pellets. Cats have an undeniable preference when it comes to which litter they would prefer to use. Be prepared to trial a few and once your cat is happy do not change it.

Litter box placement if very important. It should be in a place where your cat can get to it without difficulty and where you can get to it easily to scoop and clean. Most cats do not like to be exposed whilst toileting and some can be quite shy and require privacy. An easy to reach but discreet corner is often the best option. Cats are creatures of habit and dislike change – once your cat is used to the location of the litter box changing it can be difficult.

Keeping the litter box clean is of utmost importance. More cats have accidents because their box is dirty than for any other reason. Keeping the box clean is much easier than trying to retrain a cat who has decided that her box is filthy and refuses to use it. A litter tray should be scooped at least once a day and should be completely emptied of litter and thoroughly washed on a regular basis.

Exercise and Play

Whilst cats are not nearly as active as dogs it is important that they have the opportunity to exercise. Exercise will keep your cat’s body healthy its mind sharp and will keep it out of trouble. Many cats will run laps around the house up and over the furniture around the dining room table and off the walls when they need exercise. If you have an appropriate outside area allow your cat to exercise in the garden during the day but ensure that they are safely indoors at night.

Play is an important part in keeping your cat active and happy. Provide your cat with a variety of toys and rotate them on a regular basis to ensure that your cat is constantly stimulated. Leave some small toys such as a little ball or a furry mouse around for your cat to play with at any time. Take time each day to interact and play with your cat.

Grooming

Regular combing and brushing of long-haired cats is essential and most owners find that this is a daily requirement. Shorthaired cats are able to groom themselves except at moulting time when assistance from the owner by daily brushing is necessary. It may also be occasionally necessary to bathe your cat. Most cats are frightened of being bathed so great care must be taken.

When cats swallow hair it can result in the formation of a hair mass in the stomach known as a "fur ball." During the moulting season it may be necessary to give a teaspoonful of paraffin oil mixed with food to help eliminate fur balls.

Bengal Cat

Genetics for Cat Breeders and Veterinarians

Book Description

Robinson’s Genetics for Cat Breeders & Veterinarians 4th Edition is an essential purchase for all breeders of pedigreed cats practising small animal veterinarians and veterinary undergraduates. This fully revised edition re-establishes Genetics for Cat Breeders as the text of choice in the field of feline genetics.

Synopsis

The field of genetics has changed considerably since the first edition of "Genetics for Cat Breeders" was published in 1971. For decades the discussion of genetics was limited to observations of populations but now geneticists are beginning to look at the actual molecular mechanisms behind the traits and diseases seen in the cat. Continuing the pioneering work of the late Roy Robinson Carolyn Vella and her team of experts have significantly expanded the scope of previous editions to produce a work which is now of equal benefit to both veterinary surgeons and cat breeders. Their aim has been to make the book more accessible and understandable whilst providing an impartial look at sometimes controversial and complex issues. The book retains the most important information published in previous editions and also incorporates some of the continuing work done by Roy Robinson prior to his death. A considerable amount of new information has been added in order to provide both breeders and veterinarians with the broadest possible range of information. The authors have not only reviewed the traditional sources of scientific literature and recently published studies but have also conducted interviews with veterinarians researchers and breeders.

Bengal Cat

Bengal Cat