Lakeland Terrier

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Lakeland Terrier

Lakeland Terrier

Visit www.mylakelandterrier.com

for great info on Lakeland Terriers

plus loads of natural photos

Lakeland Terrier Rescue

 

Lakeland Terrier Breed standards

General Appearance of the Lakeland Terrier
Smart, workmanlike, well balanced and compact.

Lakeland Terrier Characteristics
Gay, fearless demeanour, keen of expression, quick of movement, on the tip-toe of expectation.

Temperament
Bold, friendly and self-confident.

Head and Skull
Well balanced. Skull flat and refined. Jaws powerful and muzzle broad but not too long. Lakeland Terriers Length of head from stop to tip of nose not exceeding that from occiput to stop. Nose black, except in liver-coated dogs when the nose will be liver.

Eyes
Dark or hazel. Slanting eyes undesirable.

Ears
Moderately small, V-shaped and carried alertly. Set neither too high nor too low on head.

Mouth
Teeth even with perfect, regular scissor bite, i.e. upper teeth closely overlapping lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Neck
Reachy, slightly arched, free from throatiness.

Forequarters
Shoulders well laid back. Forelegs straight, well boned.

Lakeland Terrier Body
Chest reasonably narrow. Back strong, moderately short and well coupled.

Hindquarters
Strong and muscular. Thighs long and powerful with well turned stifles. Hocks low to ground and straight.

Feet
Small, compact, round and well padded.

Tail
Customarily docked.
Docked: Well set on, carried gaily but not over back or curled.
Undocked: Well set on, carried gaily but not over back or curled. In overall balance with the rest of dog.

Lakeland Terrier Gait/Movement
Fore- and hindlegs carried straight forward and parallel. Elbows move perpendicular to body, working free of sides, stifles turning neither in nor out. Good drive coming from well flexing hindquarters.

Coat
Dense, harsh and weather-resisting with good undercoat.

Colour
Black and tan, blue and tan, red, wheaten, red grizzle, liver, blue or black. Small tips of white on feet and chest undesirable but permissible. Mahogany or deep tan not typical.

Size
Height not exceeding 37 cms (141/2 ins) at shoulder. Average weight: dogs: 8 kgs (17 lbs); bitches: 7 kgs (15 lbs).

Lakeland Terrier Faults
Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog.

Lakeland Terrier Rescue

Lakeland Terrier Rescue  a UK based special rescue for Fell/Patterdale Terriers including Lakeland Terriers. Before you decide on a lakeland terrier you should read their breed profiles to find out if a lakeland terrier is the right dog for you.

Buying a Puppy

  • Puppies need a lot of attention and must be constantly supervised.

  • A puppy/dog is a responsibility 365 days a year. This includes vacations, holidays, etc.

  • A dog is a long-term commitment (10 to 15 years on the average).

  • A puppy should be a permanent part of your family.

  • A puppy is not a toy, it is a living being. It is not something to be put in the backyard to be played with only when you feel like it.

Puppies and children are not always a good combinations. Bringing a dog into a family that has children should be done only after a lot of thought and planning. Small children should never be left unsupervised with a dog or puppy. Children are rough on animals and even the best children can be abusive by hitting the dog or teasing it. Do not buy a pet for a child until the child is old enough to understand how to care for the animal and be gentle with it. It is not fair to put an animal in a situation and then punish it for defending itself when it is being hurt.

A puppy is an expense. Like anything else, don’t buy one if you can’t afford to properly care for it (i.e. spay/neuter, vet care, quality food, training).   If you do not feel you have the time for a puppy, consider adopting a rescue dog.

Do not buy a puppy for the following reasons:

  • You saw the puppy in a pet store and felt sorry for it.
  • Christmas present.
  • You want your child to have a dog – puppies and children are so cute together.
  • You saw one (on T.V., at the park, at your neighbors house) and you fell in love with it.
  • Someone had a litter of puppies and you just had to take one home with you.

Lakeland Terrier

Dog Rescue    National Animal Welfare Trust

Members of the public who want to adopt a dog or puppy from one of the Trust’s Centres must first satisfy the Trust that it is likely to be a successful relationship, and that a lasting partnership will be established between the dog and it’s new owner

Matching details of the home and family  as well as their expectations of their proposed dog or puppy is a must. This information is compared with the characteristics of the dogs that the Trust has available.

The homing process may take up to three weeks before the dog will be able to leave with it’s new owner. During this time, owners and their family will be expected to visit, spending time with the dog or puppy  to form a bond.

Every potential new home is carefully vetted by a team of volunteer home-checkers before being re-housed.  The ‘homing’ procedure is only complete when they are certain that there is a very good match.  Before being homed, both puppies and dogs are vaccinated, micro-chipped and neutered.

New owners take the dog on the understanding that if things don’t work out  the dog must be returned to the Trust. Where they have no history of a dog, they will not normally re-home dogs to families with young children.

Inevitably some dogs are with the Trust for a long time, some even for the rest of their natural lives. An absolute rule of the Trust is that no healthy dog is ever put to sleep.

Lakeland Terrier

Dog Breeding Books

The Joy of Breeding Your Own Show Dog

Synopsis

Now back in print by popular demand-the only breeding book endorsed by top breeders

The bible of quality dog breeding, this guide is a must-have for novice and veteran breeders alike, covering everything from developing a viable breeding program based on pedigrees and genetics to whelping, raising, and socializing puppies. Now back in print with a new foreword by AKC Breeder of the Year Wendall Sammett, this book has long been the reference of choice for successful dog breeders.

Ann Seranne cobred and/or owned sixty-two Yorkshire Terrier champions, six Standard Poodle champions, and two Shih Tzu champions.

Explains the fundamentals of genetics, modern breeding systems, care of puppies and pregnant dogs, and how to evaluate young dogs according to breeding standards.

Lakeland Terrier Lakeland Terrier

 

 

Please email John with a photograph of your dog and he will be happy to advise how on options for portraying your dogs true likeness in oils.