Dachshund

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Dachshund

breed data

Buying a Puppy from a breeder

Puppies are adorable bundles of wagging tails, soft eyes and warm puppy kisses that pull at your heartstrings, begging you to take them home. As difficult as it may sometimes be, the choice of a puppy should not be made on the spur of the moment. Doing so has often resulted in the acquisition of a dog that does not meet the expectations of his owner. Many times these dogs are eventually resold and, unfortunately, some end up in the pound. Indeed, this is not the fault of the poor puppy; the uneducated owner is to blame.

Before buying a puppy, talk to several owners about the breed you are interested in, gather information and make an informed choice. Each breed was developed for a specific function and, as a result, their personality and traits may not match your lifestyle. Be sure to become completely familiar with the breed you are interested in before deciding to buy a puppy. Remember, your puppy is depending on you to care for and love him for life.

Dachshund

Dog Rescue    National Animal Welfare Trust

Members of the public who want to adopt a dog or puppy from one of the Trust’s Centres must first satisfy the Trust that it is likely to be a successful relationship, and that a lasting partnership will be established between the dog and it’s new owner

Matching details of the home and family  as well as their expectations of their proposed dog or puppy is a must. This information is compared with the characteristics of the dogs that the Trust has available.

The homing process may take up to three weeks before the dog will be able to leave with it’s new owner. During this time, owners and their family will be expected to visit, spending time with the dog or puppy  to form a bond.

Every potential new home is carefully vetted by a team of volunteer home-checkers before being re-housed.  The ‘homing’ procedure is only complete when they are certain that there is a very good match.  Before being homed, both puppies and dogs are vaccinated, micro-chipped and neutered.

New owners take the dog on the understanding that if things don’t work out  the dog must be returned to the Trust. Where they have no history of a dog, they will not normally re-home dogs to families with young children.

Inevitably some dogs are with the Trust for a long time, some even for the rest of their natural lives. An absolute rule of the Trust is that no healthy dog is ever put to sleep.

Dachshund

Dog Training Books

RSPCA New Complete Dog Training Manual

Synopsis

This title outlines a comprehensive RSPCA-approved programme that covers all aspects of dog training – from house-training a puppy through to introducing your dog to advanced training routines.

This revised and expanded edition of the manual explains 26 new training techniques through photographic step-by-step sequences, including a new chapter focusing on more advanced training techniques.

Dachshund Dachshund

 

 

Please email John with a photograph of your dog and he will be happy to advise how on options for portraying your dogs true likeness in oils.