Chow Chow

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Chow Chow

Oil Portrait of Chow

Buying a Puppy from a breeder

Disreputable dog breeders, who are usually in the “puppy-farm” business just for the money, can wreak misery and death on the innocent animals that would otherwise be lifelong pets and friends.

There are some simple guidelines that, if followed, could put such people out of business, and give a dog a long happy life.

Trading Standards recommendations for buying a puppy

  • Be wary of outlets offering more than one or two breeds
  • When visiting the seller note the surroundings
  • Visit the puppy more than once
  • Ask to see the pedigree papers and ensure the breeder’s name is on the certificate
  • The breeder should want to know about you too
  • Ask to see the puppy with its Mother – be very suspicious if you can’t

Puppies bred commercially, indiscriminately and carelessly are likely to…

  • Develop disease
  • Have temperamental problems
  • Find adjusting to family life hard
  • Be difficult to housetrain
  • Suffer physical defects and have hereditary weaknesses

Think carefully before buying and do not buy the puppy because you feel sorry for it.

 

Chow Chow

Dog Rescue  Dog Rescue Resources

Finding a rescue centre

‘All-breed’ dog-rescue centres throughout the UK and Ireland can be found here grouped by area at Dog Pages with breed-rescues listed separately according to breed. Nearly one thousand contacts areincluded so thereshould be one near you.

While the larger charities are well known, there are many smaller rescue organisations,  operating on small budgets but still doing a fantastic job. Not all these organisations have websites but these have been included where available. The larger charities, the Dogs Trust (formerly NCDL – National Canine Defence League), Battersea Dogs Home, the RSPCA and the Scottish SPCA, all have new online sites.

Chow Chow

Dog Breed Books

Breed Rescue: How to Start and Run a Successful Breed Rescue Program 

Explains the business of forming and operating a dog breed rescue program.

Avoid legal problems, deal with the paperwork, train and manage volunteers, raise funds, and get valuable publicity by following Boneham’s advice.

Sample forms, important contacts, guidelines for health, sanitation and more.

PUBLISHER’S COMMENTS A first of its kind! Now you have all the information you need to start a breed rescue program. Learn how to: get organized; find, train and manage volunteers; gain financial support; network with shelters and other rescue groups; find the dogs; screen dogs for medical problems; determine the dog’s temperament and behavior; place rescued dogs; and publicize your program. Plus, important contacts and addresses, and sample documents that will help your organization and keep you organized.

Chow Chow Chow Chow

 

 

Please email John with a photograph of your dog and he will be happy to advise how on options for portraying your dogs true likeness in oils.